JEFF BAXTER, ROCK MUSICIAN & CONSULTANT TO U.S. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE WHAT CAN A CLASSIC ROCK STAR DO TO HELP YOU & YOUR GARDEN CENTERS? PLENTY! WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 9 AM, IGC CENTER STAGE – LOCATED AT SHOW ENTRANCE You may be asking, how in the world does a rock musician wind up as a national security expert? And even more importantly, what’s in this for you as a garden center retailer? In today’s world of international terrorism, as well as a retail marketplace where independent garden centers must battle against big-box competitors and innovate and fight for the attention of leisure-time-challenged customers, sometimes what it takes is a most unusual individual whose “out-of-the-box” thinking caught the interest of U.S. government officials … none other than musician and national security consultant Jeff “Skunk” Baxter! How did this happen? It only took a few issues of Aviation Week magazine to pique Baxter’s interest in military technology and missile defense systems. With many hours to fill as he traveled as a rocker on tour buses and airplanes, he became self-taught in this area, and then took it upon himself to write a paper that proposed converting a ship-based anti-aircraft missile system into a rudimentary missile defense system. He passed this paper along to a local congressperson, and incredibly his career as a defense consultant began. As a consultant to the Department of Defense with high-level security clearance at the Pentagon, he now advises top military and civilian groups on “out-of-the-box” warfare, next-generation technologies and unconventional strategies. Previously, Baxter had a long and successful career in music and entertainment as a founding member of the group Steely Dan and a Grammy-winning guitarist with The Doobie Brothers. Born and raised in the Washington, D.C., area, Baxter joined his first band at age 11. While still a high school student, he worked at Jimmy's Music Shop and then for the legendary guitarist and luthier (guitar tech), Dan Armstrong, in Manhattan in 1964, where he met a then-unknown guitarist Jimi James (the future Jimi Hendrix), and, for a brief period during that year, played bass in his band. Eventually, Baxter relocated to Los Angeles, finding work as a session guitarist. In 1972, he became a founding member of the band Steely Dan, appearing on their first three albums. In 1974, he joined The Doobie Brothers, and went on to continued success with the 1976 album “Takin' It to the Streets,” 1977's “Livin' on the Fault Line” and particularly 1978's “Minute by Minute,” which spent five weeks as the No. 1 album in the U.S., spawned several hit singles and garnered six Grammys. Many speculate that the handlebar-mustached Muppet character Floyd Pepper, guitarist for Dr. Teeth and The Electric Mayhem, was created in Baxter’s image. As a studio musician, Baxter worked with Muppet master Jim Henson behind the scenes as part of the band that recorded the music for the wildly popular puppet rock ensemble. IT COMES DOWN TO THE ULTIMATE IN “OUT-OF-THE-BOX” THINKING In his exclusive keynote at IGC Show 2019, Baxter will highlight creative, unconventional problem- solving and planning techniques by showing how to apply knowledge gained in one area to advance goals in completely different fields. He’ll explain how to approach issues with new “logic templates” and how to leave preconceptions behind. Through humor and non-linear thinking, he will help audiences map effective strategies, rediscover the drive to innovate and ignite passion in their careers. Baxter will not only strip down the modern business model to show you its outdated flaws, such as the rigid, hierarchal and policy-driven roles for workers and management, he’ll also show how new technologies, practices and new ways of thinking are reaping huge benefits for organizations and individuals. He’ll tell you how these new models foster and stimulate a more agile and creative action/reaction to today’s modern, rapidly changing and competitive environment, one that the retailers of the past would have difficulty understanding and recognizing, much less anticipating.  He believes that it was an unconventional approach to thinking about terrorism, coupled with a keen interest in technology, that led to his recruitment by the government. "Conventional thought assumed that record turntables were for playing records until rappers began to use them as actual musical instruments, and we thought civilian airplanes were for carrying passengers and cargo until terrorists realized, by substituting a complicated and expensive inertial guidance system with a human zealot, they could be reconfigured into a very effective cruise missile," Baxter says. "My approach has been to look at existing technologies and try to envision other ways they can be applied, which happens in music all the time and happens to be what terrorists are incredibly good at as well." Having the skills and facility to leverage improvisational techniques and methodologies in your thinking is essential to finding answers to the unconventional crises of today. In this way, his thought process is akin to jazz, where one must think on their feet and operate in a non-linear, real-time environment consisting of rhythms, lyrics, chords, melodies and human interaction, with the goal of creating a unique analytical product. At one time, with his rock ’n’ roll hairstyle and horseshoe moustache, Baxter certainly caused a few double-takes in the corridors of the Pentagon, but as a former U.S. congressman remarked, “Once he started discussing policy and technology, people came around very quickly.” Many of the problem-solving templates we are familiar with are based on 19th- or 20th-century models that either don't exist now or have morphed into something very different. Baxter knows that providing great decision-makers with the best skills, tools and capabilities greatly increases the probability for positive outcomes. Unconventional problems require unconventional approaches and solutions. Wednesday, August 14, 9 am, IGC Show Center Stage
Jeff ‘Skunk’ Baxter played guitar for both Steely Dan and the Doobie Brothers.
BACK TO KEYNOTES THIS IS AN ARCHIVE OF THE IGC SHOW ’19 WEBSITE. LOOK FOR OUR NEW 2020 SITE SOON.
BACK TO KEYNOTES JEFF BAXTER, ROCK MUSICIAN & CONSULTANT TO U.S. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE WHAT CAN A CLASSIC ROCK STAR DO TO HELP YOU & YOUR GARDEN CENTERS? PLENTY! WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 9 AM, IGC CENTER STAGE – LOCATED AT SHOW ENTRANCE
You may be asking, how in the world does a rock musician wind up as a national security expert? And even more importantly, what’s in this for you as a garden center retailer? In today’s world of international terrorism, as well as a retail marketplace where independent garden centers must battle against big-box competitors and innovate and fight for the attention of leisure-time- challenged customers, sometimes what it takes is a most unusual individual whose “out-of-the-box” thinking caught the interest of U.S. government officials … none other than musician and national security consultant Jeff “Skunk” Baxter! How did this happen? It only took a few issues of Aviation Week magazine to pique Baxter’s interest in military technology and missile defense systems. With many hours to fill as he traveled as a rocker on tour buses and airplanes, he became self- taught in this area, and then took it upon himself to write a paper that proposed converting a ship-based anti-aircraft missile system into a rudimentary missile defense system. He passed this paper along to a local congressperson, and incredibly his career as a defense consultant began. As a consultant to the Department of Defense with high-level security clearance at the Pentagon, he now advises top military and civilian groups on “out-of-the-box” warfare, next- generation technologies and unconventional strategies. Previously, Baxter had a long and successful career in music and entertainment as a founding member of the group Steely Dan and a Grammy- winning guitarist with The Doobie Brothers. Born and raised in the Washington, D.C., area, Baxter joined his first band at age 11. While still a high school student, he worked at Jimmy's Music Shop and then for the legendary guitarist and luthier (guitar tech), Dan Armstrong, in Manhattan in 1964, where he met a then- unknown guitarist Jimi James (the future Jimi Hendrix), and, for a brief period during that year, played bass in his band. Eventually, Baxter relocated to Los Angeles, finding work as a session guitarist. In 1972, he became a founding member of the band Steely Dan, appearing on their first three albums. In 1974, he joined The Doobie Brothers, and went on to continued success with the 1976 album “Takin' It to the Streets,” 1977's “Livin' on the Fault Line” and particularly 1978's “Minute by Minute,” which spent five weeks as the No. 1 album in the U.S., spawned several hit singles and garnered six Grammys. Many speculate that the handlebar- mustached Muppet character Floyd Pepper, guitarist for Dr. Teeth and The Electric Mayhem, was created in Baxter’s image. As a studio musician, Baxter worked with Muppet master Jim Henson behind the scenes as part of the band that recorded the music for the wildly popular puppet rock ensemble. IT COMES DOWN TO THE ULTIMATE IN “OUT-OF- THE-BOX” THINKING In his exclusive keynote at IGC Show 2019, Baxter will highlight creative, unconventional problem-solving and planning techniques by showing how to apply knowledge gained in one area to advance goals in completely different fields. He’ll explain how to approach issues with new “logic templates” and how to leave preconceptions behind. Through humor and non-linear thinking, he will help audiences map effective strategies, rediscover the drive to innovate and ignite passion in their careers. Baxter will not only strip down the modern business model to show you its outdated flaws, such as the rigid, hierarchal and policy-driven roles for workers and management, he’ll also show how new technologies, practices and new ways of thinking are reaping huge benefits for organizations and individuals. He’ll tell you how these new models foster and stimulate a more agile and creative action/reaction to today’s modern, rapidly changing and competitive environment, one that the retailers of the past would have difficulty understanding and recognizing, much less anticipating.  He believes that it was an unconventional approach to thinking about terrorism, coupled with a keen interest in technology, that led to his recruitment by the government. "Conventional thought assumed that record turntables were for playing records until rappers began to use them as actual musical instruments, and we thought civilian airplanes were for carrying passengers and cargo until terrorists realized, by substituting a complicated and expensive inertial guidance system with a human zealot, they could be reconfigured into a very effective cruise missile," Baxter says. "My approach has been to look at existing technologies and try to envision other ways they can be applied, which happens in music all the time and happens to be what terrorists are incredibly good at as well." Having the skills and facility to leverage improvisational techniques and methodologies in your thinking is essential to finding answers to the unconventional crises of today. In this way, his thought process is akin to jazz, where one must think on their feet and operate in a non-linear, real-time environment consisting of rhythms, lyrics, chords, melodies and human interaction, with the goal of creating a unique analytical product. At one time, with his rock ’n’ roll hairstyle and horseshoe moustache, Baxter certainly caused a few double-takes in the corridors of the Pentagon, but as a former U.S. congressman remarked, “Once he started discussing policy and technology, people came around very quickly.” Many of the problem-solving templates we are familiar with are based on 19th- or 20th-century models that either don't exist now or have morphed into something very different. Baxter knows that providing great decision-makers with the best skills, tools and capabilities greatly increases the probability for positive outcomes. Unconventional problems require unconventional approaches and solutions. Wednesday, August 14, 9 am, IGC Center Stage
Jeff ‘Skunk’ Baxter played guitar for both Steely Dan and the Doobie Brothers.
THIS IS AN ARCHIVE OF THE IGC SHOW ’19 WEBSITE. LOOK FOR OUR NEW 2020 SITE SOON.
Lakeside | McCormick Chicago, IL USA
AUGUST 11-13, 2020
Lakeside | McCormick  Chicago, IL USA
AUGUST 11-13, 2020   #IGCSHOW
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