MARK BELLING, TOP-RATED RADIO TALK SHOW HOST & COMMENTATOR CRACKING THE MILLENNIAL CODE: A LOOK AT THE GENERATION WHO AT TIMES MAKES US LAUGH … AND TEAR OUR HAIR OUT! THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 9 AM, IGC CENTER STAGE – LOCATED AT SHOW ENTRANCE Mark Belling is one of the best- known local talk show hosts in America. Additionally, for years, he has been a guest host on America’s most-listened to radio program, “The Rush Limbaugh Show.” He’s a long-time member of TALKERS magazine’s “Heavy Hundred,” a listing of the most important talk shows in America. Belling’s show in afternoon drive- time on 1130 WISN-AM in Milwaukee, WI, is one of the highest-rated local talk programs in the country and routinely wins its time slot. He has won the National Association of Broadcasters’ Marconi Radio Award for Medium Market Personality of the Year. His show is a mixture of his principled conservatism, lifestyle issues and anything else, as he says, “I feel like talking about.” One of those hot-button topics with Baby Boomer-aged Belling is his fascination with the vastly different Millennial generation and how they are changing both our country’s economy and culture. Talking with thousands of call-in listeners on both his local show and when filling in on Limbaugh’s program over the years, Belling has developed an insightful vision into this unique generation that he will bring to our IGC Show stage. Every retailer, big and small, is changing their retail environment to appeal to them. Every employer is changing company policies to work with them. It won't be long before half the employees in the workplace are Millennials. Belling notes some things are just obvious facts about Millennials, like their age: the oldest, who is now 34, and the youngest, who is 18. He says there are certain things that we can say about them that appear to hold true. They are reluctant to engage in homeownership - not good news for a garden center industry born in the suburbs. They're getting married much later in life. The average year for first marriage in the United States keeps going up. They tend not to have as many one-on-one relationships. They tend to go out in groups. In the workplace, they love collaboration. They love working together and being part of teams. They require constant feedback. Rather than being independent, they're far more effective in a group setting and with a lot of direction and feedback. Financially, they appear to be rather conservative. Again, as a group, they seem to be delaying, or eliminating, having children. Belling observes that “Millennial males, primarily white males, tend to be very passive in social interaction. Usually, guys in their 20s are the most aggressive people in the world. This group seems not to be. They all sit together in packs when they go out. They're all wearing plaid shirts. They're drinking light beers. They're not approaching a single woman. In the meantime, the women come in there like bulls in a china shop. They're slamming down the shots. They're the ones who are loud. They're the ones who are barking at the top of their lungs. If there's any dancing to be done, it's the woman who’s asking the man.” There are so many things about this generation that are different than what we've seen before - it requires some adapting. There are economic components to it. The housing market is probably the most dramatic. There's also been talk, however, about long-term trends in the stock market. Many people have assumed that as the Baby Boomers go from investing years to retirement years, which are primarily spending years where you take the money out rather than continuing to put it in, that money would be replaced by this large group coming in behind them, the Millennials. Once Millennials get into their 30s and start earning more and more money, will they invest in the stock market? Or will they be timid about that as they appear to be with the housing market? Again, people don't really know. In terms of long-term employment trends, Millennials have contributed to significant shortages in certain occupations and surpluses in others. And then there's the whole societal thing - Millennials love to talk about themselves. They're the generation who has been told from the day they were born how special they are. They're the ones who have been smothered with attention. They're the ones who have been made the focus of everything, more so really than any other generation of Americans. So it's not surprising that they enjoy the attention they’re essentially accustomed to getting. As for the rest of us, we kind of shake our heads and wonder how it is that we're going to adapt. As employers of Millennials, retailers are finding themselves dealing with the generation’s sense of entitlement. Employment benefits and enticements have been directly impacted by the cultural shifts of the workforce. Things that employers once used to recruit and keep only their top employees in years past, a caller in retail management told Belling, have now become so standard that employees in even the most basic entry-level jobs feel they are entitled to them. All part of the changing generational scene. Belling clearly has his finger on the pulse of the vitally important Millennial demographic. Come and hear his insightful, entertaining message that will send you back to your store inspired with new ideas on how to sell to this fascinating, dynamic generation who doesn’t really want to be sold to but represents a gold mine to retailers who successfully crack their code. Thursday, August 15, 9 am, IGC Show Center Stage
BACK TO KEYNOTES THIS IS AN ARCHIVE OF THE IGC SHOW ’19 WEBSITE. LOOK FOR OUR NEW 2020 SITE SOON.
BACK TO KEYNOTES MARK BELLING, TOP-RATED RADIO TALK SHOW HOST & COMMENTATOR CRACKING THE MILLENNIAL CODE: A LOOK AT THE GENERATION WHO AT TIMES MAKES US LAUGH … AND TEAR OUR HAIR OUT! THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 9 AM, IGC CENTER STAGE – LOCATED AT SHOW ENTRANCE
Mark Belling is one of the best-known local talk show hosts in America. Additionally, for years, he has been a guest host on America’s most-listened to radio program, “The Rush Limbaugh Show.” He’s a long-time member of TALKERS magazine’s “Heavy Hundred,” a listing of the most important talk shows in America. Belling’s show in afternoon drive-time on 1130 WISN-AM in Milwaukee, WI, is one of the highest-rated local talk programs in the country and routinely wins its time slot. He has won the National Association of Broadcasters’ Marconi Radio Award for Medium Market Personality of the Year. His show is a mixture of his principled conservatism, lifestyle issues and anything else, as he says, “I feel like talking about.” One of those hot-button topics with Baby Boomer-aged Belling is his fascination with the vastly different Millennial generation and how they are changing both our country’s economy and culture. Talking with thousands of call-in listeners on both his local show and when filling in on Limbaugh’s program over the years, Belling has developed an insightful vision into this unique generation that he will bring to our IGC Show stage. Every retailer, big and small, is changing their retail environment to appeal to them. Every employer is changing company policies to work with them. It won't be long before half the employees in the workplace are Millennials. Belling notes some things are just obvious facts about Millennials, like their age: the oldest, who is now 34, and the youngest, who is 18. He says there are certain things that we can say about them that appear to hold true. They are reluctant to engage in homeownership - not good news for a garden center industry born in the suburbs. They're getting married much later in life. The average year for first marriage in the United States keeps going up. They tend not to have as many one- on-one relationships. They tend to go out in groups. In the workplace, they love collaboration. They love working together and being part of teams. They require constant feedback. Rather than being independent, they're far more effective in a group setting and with a lot of direction and feedback. Financially, they appear to be rather conservative. Again, as a group, they seem to be delaying, or eliminating, having children. Belling observes that “Millennial males, primarily white males, tend to be very passive in social interaction. Usually, guys in their 20s are the most aggressive people in the world. This group seems not to be. They all sit together in packs when they go out. They're all wearing plaid shirts. They're drinking light beers. They're not approaching a single woman. In the meantime, the women come in there like bulls in a china shop. They're slamming down the shots. They're the ones who are loud. They're the ones who are barking at the top of their lungs. If there's any dancing to be done, it's the woman who’s asking the man.” There are so many things about this generation that are different than what we've seen before - it requires some adapting. There are economic components to it. The housing market is probably the most dramatic. There's also been talk, however, about long-term trends in the stock market. Many people have assumed that as the Baby Boomers go from investing years to retirement years, which are primarily spending years where you take the money out rather than continuing to put it in, that money would be replaced by this large group coming in behind them, the Millennials. Once Millennials get into their 30s and start earning more and more money, will they invest in the stock market? Or will they be timid about that as they appear to be with the housing market? Again, people don't really know. In terms of long-term employment trends, Millennials have contributed to significant shortages in certain occupations and surpluses in others. And then there's the whole societal thing - Millennials love to talk about themselves. They're the generation who has been told from the day they were born how special they are. They're the ones who have been smothered with attention. They're the ones who have been made the focus of everything, more so really than any other generation of Americans. So it's not surprising that they enjoy the attention they’re essentially accustomed to getting. As for the rest of us, we kind of shake our heads and wonder how it is that we're going to adapt. As employers of Millennials, retailers are finding themselves dealing with the generation’s sense of entitlement. Employment benefits and enticements have been directly impacted by the cultural shifts of the workforce. Things that employers once used to recruit and keep only their top employees in years past, a caller in retail management told Belling, have now become so standard that employees in even the most basic entry-level jobs feel they are entitled to them. All part of the changing generational scene. Belling clearly has his finger on the pulse of the vitally important Millennial demographic. Come and hear his insightful, entertaining message that will send you back to your store inspired with new ideas on how to sell to this fascinating, dynamic generation who doesn’t really want to be sold to but represents a gold mine to retailers who successfully crack their code. Thursday, August 15, 9 am, IGC Center Stage
THIS IS AN ARCHIVE OF THE IGC SHOW ’19 WEBSITE. LOOK FOR OUR NEW 2020 SITE SOON.
Lakeside | McCormick Chicago, IL USA
AUGUST 11-13, 2020
Lakeside | McCormick  Chicago, IL USA
AUGUST 11-13, 2020   #IGCSHOW
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